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    the role of microorganisms in Earth's nutrient cycles

    and as symbionts of other organisms

  • Cycling of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur

    affect the health of our planet

  • Ancient invaders -

    Bacterial symbionts of amoebae

    and the evolution of the intracellular lifestyle

  • The human microbiome -

    Our own social network of microbial friends

  • Marine symbioses:

    Listening in on conversations

    between animals and the microbes they can't live without

  • Single cell techniques offer new insights

    into the ecology of microbes

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Latest publications

A bacterial pioneer produces cellulase complexes that persist through community succession

Kolinko S, Wu YW, Tachea F, Denzel E, Hiras J, Gabriel R, Bäcker N, Chan LJG, Eichorst SA, Frey D, Chen Q, Azadi P, Adams PD, Pray TR, Tanjore D, Petzold CJ, Gladden JM, Simmons BA, Singer SW
2017 - Nat Microbiol, in press

Ammonia-oxidising archaea living at low pH: Insights from comparative genomics

Obligate acidophilic members of the thaumarchaeotal genus Candidatus Nitrosotalea play an important role in nitrification in acidic soils, but their evolutionary and physiological adaptations to acidic environments are still poorly understood, with only a single member of this genus (Ca. N. devanaterra) having its genome sequenced. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of two additional cultured Ca. Nitrosotalea strains, extracted an almost complete Ca. Nitrosotalea metagenome-assembled genome from an acidic fen, and performed comparative genomics of the four Ca. Nitrosotalea genomes with 19 other archaeal ammonia oxidiser genomes. Average nucleotide and amino acid identities revealed that the four Ca. Nitrosotalea strains represent separate species within the genus. The four Ca. Nitrosotalea genomes contained a core set of 103 orthologous gene families absent from all other ammonia-oxidizing archaea and, for most of these gene families, expression could be demonstrated in laboratory culture or the environment via proteomic or metatranscriptomic analyses, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that four of these core gene families were acquired by the Ca. Nitrosotalea common ancestor via horizontal gene transfer from acidophilic representatives of Euryarchaeota. We hypothesize that gene exchange with these acidophiles contributed to the competitive success of the Ca. Nitrosotalea lineage in acidic environments. 

Herbold CW, Lehtovirta-Morley LE, Jung M-Y, Jehmlich N, Hausmann B, Han P, Loy A, Pester M, Sayavedra-Soto LA, Rhee S-K, Prosser JI, Nicol GW, Wagner M, Gubry-Rangin C
2017 - Environ Microbiol, In press

Abiotic conversion of extracellular NH2OH contributes to N2O emission during ammonia oxidation

Abiotic processes involving the reactive ammonia-oxidation intermediates nitric oxide (NO) or hydroxylamine (NH2OH) for N2O production has been indicated recently. The latter process would require the availability of substantial amounts of free NH2OH for chemical reactions during ammonia (NH3) oxidation, but little is known about extracellular NH2OH formation by the different clades of ammonia-oxidizing microbes. Here we determined extracellular NH2OH concentrations in culture media of several ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), as well as one complete ammonia oxidizer (comammox) enrichment (Ca. Nitrospira inopinata) during incubation under standard cultivation conditions. NH2OH was measurable in the incubation media of Nitrosomonas europaea, Nitrosospira multiformis, Nitrososphaera gargensis, and Ca. Nitrosotenuis uzonensis, but not in media of the other tested AOB and AOA. NH2OH was also formed by the comammox enrichment during NH3 oxidation. This enrichment exhibited the largest NH2OH:final product ratio (1.92%), followed by N. multiformis (0.56%) and N. gargensis (0.46%). The maximum proportions of NH4+ converted to N2O via extracellular NH2OH during incubation, estimated on the basis of NH2OH abiotic conversion rates, were 0.12%, 0.08% and 0.14% for AOB, AOA and Ca. Nitrospira inopinata, respectively, and were consistent with published NH4+:N2O conversion ratios for AOB and AOA.

Liu S, Han P, Hink L, Prosser JI, Wagner M, Brüggemann N
2017 - Environ. Sci. Technol., in press

Lecture series

Microbiomics of the human gut and the ocean

Peer Bork
Structural and Computational Biology Unit, EMBL Heidelberg
24.11.2017
09:30 h
Hörsaal 2, UZA 1, Althanstr. 14, 1090 Wien

The rapidly expanding universe of giant viruses

Chantal Abergel
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique & Aix-Marseille University
29.06.2017
16:30 h
Hörsaal 2, UZA 1, Althanstr. 14, 1090 Wien

The importance of growing slowly: roles for redox-active "antibiotics" in microbial survival and development

Dianne Newman
California Institute of Technology
24.05.2017
14:00 h
Hörsaal 2, UZA1, Althanstr. 14, 1090 Wien